The Tail Gunner Guest Stars at Kirby’s Lane

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Kirby Larson is an inspiration. We first met at Northwest Institute of Literary Arts, then again when I was producing ColumbiaKids online magazine. Kirby was one of our first “One Day in History” fiction shorts authors, and we were lucky to have her. Soon after she was nominated for the Newbery award for her novel Hattie Big Sky. I like to think that her ColumbiaKids story about a boy who had to leave behind his dog to go to a World War II internment camp was the inspiration for a number of her World War II era books that followed, but I know that’s probably a stretch. She had them in her all along.

DASH by Kirby Larson. Can't wait to read it.

DASH by Kirby Larson. Can’t wait to read it.

Kirby’s work and her indefatigable spirit are just some of the reasons why I was so honored to have her ask me to be a guest on her blog, Kirby’s Lane. While THE TAIL GUNNER and Kirby’s historical fiction books are quite different in approach, they do tackle the challenge of catapulting readers into the past, into eras that current generations can hardly comprehend. I’m very excited to begin reading Kirby’s recent release DASH, the story of a young Japanese girl who must leave her dog behind to go to an internment camp at the outbreak of World War II. Sound familiar? I thought so too.

Want to find out more Kirby and her work? Pop on over to Kirby’s Lane, a place for readers and writers. You’ll be ¬†glad you did.

Here’s to Veterans Everywhere

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Dad carried a postcard set that contained "The Gunner's Vow" all through the war. As the survivor of 59 missions as a WWII tail gunner, he always made a habit of sitting with his back to a wall, facing the door.

Dad carried a postcard set that contained “The Gunner’s Vow” all through the war. As the survivor of 59 missions as a WWII tail gunner, he always made a habit of sitting with his back to a wall, facing the door.

One of the most amazing things about this project has been getting to know and understand more about active service. Writing THE TAIL GUNNER has led me into a world that Dad barely talked about for many reasons. It was a painful time and he was a “forward thinking” man, always more interested in embracing the future than reminiscing about the past.

For those reasons, as well as the fact that I was born in the 1960s when war was way out of fashion, I never wanted to study much about wars or the men who fought in them. Dad didn’t mind a bit.

But what has been intriguing is the mystery of all that he left behind, and the people it has led me to. At one point, I had the good fortune to do a phone interview with Norm Doe (since passed), one of the pilots Dad thought highly of. Norm filled me in on so many mysteries like why it took so long to get across the Atlantic when they shipped out (U-Boat dodging), and how Dad and Doe hadn’t flown together outside of training but once.

In another instance, I found a list of names at the back of Dad’s diary that I figured must have been good friends. As I found out later, they were men in his squadron that had been killed in action. Although I couldn’t use their real names in the novel, their story was memorialized by the characters StuBoy and Valentine. Getting shot down in enemy territory was every bomber-boy’s nightmare.

Despite the difficulties the characters face in THE TAIL GUNNER, it is also a story of hope, and a story about how the dead have the opportunity to choose how to end their stories. As StuBoy explains to Sylvie in the novel, these men get a choice: Take a swig of Lethe Lightning and forget all the horrors and highlights of life and war, or attempt a final mission to set right whatever life-bound wrongs may haunt them. Bish chose a final mission, and his mission makes the book.

We all have our missions in life. We may not know them, but they are there, waiting for us to step foot on the waiting path. If someone had told me when I was in my 20s that I’d one day write a novel about World War II, I would have told them there was no way. But for the last seven years that has been my path. So to all veterans living and passed, I say “Thanks” for your courage, your dedication, and for your stories, both silent and loud. How we stand up for what we believe in makes us who we are.